Literary walking route in classic Weimar

24 Dec Literary walking route in classic Weimar

Proposal for a literary walking route in Classic Weimar.

I visited Weimar in September 2017 as part of European Heritage Volunteers program. As I was getting ready for the trip, what came to my mind was the literary giants one would normally associate with. So, I re-read a biography of Goethe and a had a look at Wilhelm Tell.

Great copy of Wilhelm Tell by Schiller edited for children

I was looking forward to discovering this small German town and also learning more about its astonishing literary heritage.  Weimar was a place where lots of writing was done mainly by four famous men: Goethe, Schiller, Herder and Wieland.

I had one day to myself that with an inspiration, wished to come up with a literary walking route in Classic Weimar. Could this be an added value of heritage to Weimar’s appeal?

The cultural richness of the city amazed me with every step I took between monuments. As Goethe, himself wrote:

“Where else can you find so many good things in one spot?”

This day was an opportunity for an experience in situ following a theme and what I had in mind was the demand of more literate and active travelers who wished to visit Weimar. These were the people who seeked for ways to be in contact with their favorite writers. To my amazement, a way-marked literary walking route in Weimar did not exist. One had to put all bits and pieces together with self-effort to visit these literary spots.

To my amazement, a way-marked literary walking route in Weimar did not exist. One had to put all bits and pieces together with self-effort to visit these literary spots.

Heritage with a literary dimension could empower the emotional link to the town so a way- marked route in Weimar could highly contribute to the already existing cultural itineraries.

Walking routes inspired by urban themes are ever popular visiting a new city either on a classical map, listening to an audio guide or following an app. It always helps the traveler if the route is way-marked so that one can just walk from one distinct point to another.

One inspiration to me was the “music route in Leipzig: Notenspur”(www.notenspur-leipzig.de ). The route was realized partly by City of Leipzig wanting to support Leipzig’s music tradition.

I’ve added the literary walking route in Weimar on a Google map as they would be on the way-marked route and practically aimed for a day’s touring in this tranquil German town full of literature, art and architecture.  It ended up being 5 days with 35 spots and then I reduced it to 4 days and 23 spots.

The first two days of the walk is mainly in the urban city center which is followed by a nice afternoon in Park Ilm and a last day on a train to nearby Ossmanstedt.

The literary walking route in Weimar has markings for café and restaurants that one can take breaks as they go. I’ve tried adding significant literary points for that purpose,too.

I’ve ended up using most of the original German place names like Goethe’s Wohnhaus (instead of Goethe’s house) but used the English translation for places like Römisches Haus (I used Roman House instead)

My free pass to visit any museum in Weimar as part of the volunteering program

 

 

Please follow the literary walking route at my Heritage Times’ article: